Scottie Brooches

November 27, 2010

As an experiment, I thought I’d take a cast of my favourite celluloid brooch. It was made in occupied Japan (around the late 1940’s).

I’ve also made card labels with a scottie graphic because I can’t resist doing a wee bit of packaging!

When they come out of the mould they have to be trimmed, and the wax mould release removed before painting. A brooch pin is glued on to the back and the final stage is sealing them up in cellophane bags and stapling on the card header.

They’re all slightly different, even though I’m not particularly trying to make them that way, but when I find a combination of base colour and paint that looks good I’ll probably try to stick to that for the sake of consistency.

Here’s the finished result.

White Scottie brooch

White versions

Assorted Brooch Samples

Some steps in the process:

curing in moulds

Removed from mould, still with flashing

Test Pieces

Packaging design and Sample

Might consider full-time production!

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I’ve been making chocolate dogs for the run up to Christmas and I finally got them all done! The occasional nose or ear got stuck inside the moulds but apart from that the tempering went reasonably well.

You know that the tempering has been done properly if the chocolate sets quickly and shrinks away from the inside of the mould (making it appear glassy on the outside). It’s very satisfying when the figure pops out easily and has a lovely glossy sheen. The company that makes these moulds has been going for about 60 years or so. Some of them look like they’ve been taken from ceramic ornaments from way back, which I love, and of course the original metal moulds have been updated to vacuum moulded polycarbonate ones. The moulds I used to make these are pictured further down.

Pink and White Bonzo

''If there's one speck a'doyt on dat son a'mine!"

Tiny Chocolate Puppies

Back View, Choc Pups

Fantastic Moulds!

Puppy Mould

Chocolate Assortment

more varieties

I’m thinking about making my own mould loosely based on Tin Tin’s dog, Snowy (loose enough to avoid any litigation, that is!). Here’s a little slide show of the above pic’s and some different ones.

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Just got to bag them up now and give  them away to good homes!

'Teeny'

Chocolate dogs!

November 9, 2010

Chocolate dogs – the best kind of dog! Well not really, only if you don’t have a real one of your own. It’s nearly time to get  some more batches done – these are some I made last year. I have 4 different dog moulds in total, this is the Scottie one. I’ll add pic’s of the new ‘litters’ as they’re made.

Archie the terrier

The moulds are professional ones from Holland and there are so many amazing ones to choose from that it’s hard to decide which ones to buy. What helps you decide is the fact that they cost a fortune, so you have to seriously curtail your list.

I like chocolate in general, but my favourite is Cadbury’s which is not suitable for melting and tempering, so I have to be sneaky sometimes and make the outer shell from couverture chocolate and then have thick luscious layers of Cadbury’s  inside!

To see pictures of real life ‘Archie’  and to get some sage tips on all things culinary, visit Wine Splodge. It’s written by a guy called Jonathan, who’s cooked some of the best things I’ve ever eaten – he’s good, he’s seriously good!

(cute pic. of real Archie in ‘Fri 1st May 2009’ blog.)

Chocolate Isetta

November 5, 2010

I managed to get hold of a fantastic little metal chocolate mould of an Isetta bubble car! The mould itself is a thing of beauty – it was on loan from Nicholas Oddy who ia a tutor at Glasgow School of Art – many thanks, Nicholas!

After making samples of the chocolate version I delivered them to him at the G.S.A and found him in his study holding a tutorial with a group of students.  The study is very cosy, and lined with books and many, many fascinating objects. In the middle of it sat a small table laid out with tea things and slices of cake, and I have to say that the atmosphere in there that dark winter afternoon was brilliant!

Chocolate mould - Isetta Bubble car

I’m more used to working with polycarbonate moulds and thought that I might have problems with the metal one as is was quite old. Any corrosion on the inside, however slight, might cause the chocolate to stick to it. I was relieved when the first one came out with ease.

I made milk and dark versions, and white chocolate ones tinted with food colouring. Nicholas owns a beautiful Messerschmitt KR 175 (2b), and a is font of knowledge on all things Bubble car so I knew that he’d pick me up on the artistic licence I’d used when tinting the chocolate – but hey, I didn’t have a full range of food colourings available. (that’s my excuse anyway!)

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More moulded chocolates soon.